Saturday, September 26, 2020

Diecast 64 September 2020 Race RESULTS

 We saw some really great Hot Wheels racing this month with cars sent in from all over the United States as well as several other countries.  Our feature race this month was the Six Wheel Big Rig Race.  This is some of the best diecast racing you'll find anywhere. We raced all five classes this month.


You can check out full printed results for the races at https://drive.google.com/embeddedfolderview?id=1loDxj5MYBzwroQ4YEpw2nT-PZ-M7jo9F#list


Open Modified






Modified Street






Open Stock




Hot Off The Shelf




Feature Race: Six Wheel Big Rigs





Thursday, August 27, 2020

Making Your Hot Wheels Racing Videos Look Amazing

Shooting great race video is half the battle when it comes to hosting races. Usually people have worked very hard on their cars and they want to see them race. There are a few things that will help make your video enjoyable for your racers. 

 The first thing I would suggest is to follow the cars with the camera. Many times these cars are traveling so fast that if the camera is just set up on a tripod somewhere along the track or at the end the cars are going to look blurry. Also, depending on how long the track is, at some point in the video the cars may be pretty small. If you can follow the cars with the camera, the video will be a lot more enjoyable for your racers. 

Slowing the video down a bit will also make the video more enjoyable. It will give your racers a little more time to cheer and root for their cars in the race. However if all you do is use video editing software to slow the video down it will not look as good or smooth. It will be much better if you can shoot more frames per second. To do that you need a camera that can do that. Most phones these days have the ability to change the frame rate. Action cameras also generally have higher frame rate capability. 

 Go-Pros are a great action camera, but can be a bit pricey. They are however, the Cadillac of action cameras so if you have the money to spend, they are a great option. 



 If you want an action camera at a lower price point, I really like the EKEN action camera. I’ve been using one for a while now since my Go-Pro died and have felt like it is a really good affordable option.


 

If you are going to shoot your video at a higher frame rate you are going to need some extra lighting. Your regular room lighting is not going to cut it. To get started I would suggest a couple of work lights.



These lights are super bright. The way I use them is to point them at the ceiling and use the reflected light. They will definitely brighten up the room and help your slow motion videos look much better and clearer. However, if you try to point them right at the track, you’re going to get a lot of shadows as well as probably some “hot” spots on camera…places that look really bright compared to others. 

For some lighting that that is a little better to directly light up the track you should check out this softbox photography lighting kit



 It will help light up your track with much softer light and will reduce the hard shadows and bright spots that you get with the work lights. 

 A combination of the work lights reflected off the ceiling and the softbox photography lights lighting up the track will really help your slow motion video look great. 

 Another fun little tool for helping with your filming is this versatile camera rig



 There are several different places where you can mount cameras, lights, microphones, or whatever, as well as your phone. You can simultaneously shoot video on your phone and action camera, plus mount an extra light as well, all at the same time. It can definitely boost your creativity having so many options! 

 Hopefully some of these tips will help your race videos turn out great and keep racers coming back to your track for many more races to come.

Monday, August 17, 2020

Making Hot Wheels Cars Fast - What You'll Need

So you're ready to start modifying Hot Wheels cars to make them faster.  What you need is an out of this world modifying kit.  I've put together a list of things that will really come in handy as you begin modifying Hot Wheels cars.


JB Kwik Weld is my go to for "gluing" stuff together.  I'll use it to glue axles down, glue weight in, glue the car back together.  Pretty much anything that needs to be stuck together JB Kwik will do the job.  If you are modding cars I would say it is pretty much essential.  Click HERE to get JB Kwik Weld





When working with cars you want a good pair of safety glasses. I usually try to wear mine the whole time I'm working on cars, but for sure I always use mine while I'm drilling or cutting.  Also always while I'm polishing axles.  I don't want any metal polish flipping up in my eyes.  A pair with lights on them can really come in handy depending on what your working conditions are and how much light you have in your work station. Click HERE for Safety Glasses






This is the size of drill bit that you are going to use to drill out the rivet on your car so that you can get it apart.  I do like to use a smaller bit, say 1/16 or so as a pilot hole.  It keeps the 3/16 bit straight and centered as you drill and makes drilling out the rivet a bit easier. For 3/16" drill bits click HERE.





This mini vice is super handy for holding on to the body of the car as you drill or cut.  Especially to help protect your hands from getting hurt by stray saw blades, Dremel bits, or drill bits. For this cool mini vice clamp click HERE.




A set of jewelers files come in handy, especially to clean up any edges from where you've cut the metal.  I find myself hogging out wheel wells periodically so bigger wheels will fit and the files also help clean that up. For get jewelers files click HERE.




I don't find myself using  the hacksaw all the time, but periodically I'll use it to do some heavy modifying.  Especially when I'm extending a chassis. For Hacksaws click HERE.



I use clay for a few different things, but mostly as a way to add a little extra weight. I'll also use it to hold lead weights in my cars.  For clay click HERE.



I will use this the same way as clay.  I will also use Blue Tack when testing cars.  Initially I might use it to just stick some weight on the top of a car and test it to see if it's got potential to be fast in a certain weight class.  Then after working on a car I will use it to hold a car together for some testing. To get some Blue Tack click HERE.




I Dremel comes in handy for all sorts of things.  You could probably get away with just using a drill, but the Dremel is just so much easier to work with.  Definitely where I use it the most is for polishing axles using a polishing pad.  But I also use it quite a bit for cutting, sanding, and grinding. For a Dremel click HERE
 




I use these side cutters to cut the tabs to get axles out.  I have a thicker and thinner set, but I love my thin ones, they seem to be especially helpful for cars with metal bases. For side cutters click HERE.


https://amzn.to/3cX4IsZ
I use Q-Tips to apply polishes and for clean-up.  If you cut one in half you can use the stick side to mix and apply JB Kwik and then use the Q-Tip side to clean up any mess. To get Q-Tips click HERE.


Round pointy toothpicks are my go-to for mixing and applying JB Kwik Weld. For Toothpicks click HERE.




Polishing compound is a must if you are planning to make your cars fast.  Polishing axles with a good polishing compound is essential to reducing friction between your axles and wheels and producing the kind of speed you need to be competitive. For polishing compound click HERE.





These are the polishing pads I use to polish axles.  I actually cut them in half both because I think they are easier to work with when polishing and then a package lasts twice as long. To  get some polishing pads click HERE.



Axle Jig
Another tool that I use is an axle jig.  Whenever swapping axles and gluing them down I put the car in an axle jig to keep everything straight. The key is to make sure that the front axles are parallel with the rear axles.  There are several different ways you can make an axle jig, but the easiest is to glue some grooved dowel pins down to a base.  Even if the wheels don't fit perfectly in between the pins, the grooves grab the wheels wherever they touch and still keep things straight.
For Grooved Dowel Pins click HERE.





I use a few different things for weight that I always like to  have on hand.  Wheel weights are handy. They usually have an adhesive back which is nice for sticking the weight down without having to use JB Kwik Weld.  The draw back is that they only come in a few pre-determined weights.  Still, I will use them to get close to the weight I want and then finish things off with some clay or fishing weights.  I like fishing weights because they come in  a lot of different sizes/weights so you can mix and match to get right on the weight limit.  If you really need to pack a lot of weight into a small space then tungsten weights can come in pretty handy.  Tungsten is a bit more expensive though, so I try to use tungsten weights in a way that I will be able to re-use them.
For lead fishing weights click HERE
For wheels weights click HERE
For tungsten weights click HERE


Graphite is a must when it comes to making fast Hot Wheels cars.  Most that have been racing for a while have a brand that they swear by, and some even have their own secret recipes of mixed brands of graphite.  Definitely try a few and see what you think,  but a good place to start is with xlr8 graphite.  For graphite click HERE.





I love these little plastic clips. I use them most for holding cars together while the JB Kwik weld dries after I have finished working on a car.  But they come in handy for all sorts of things. For plastic clips click HERE.



Wheel Spacers
Another thing that I try to always have on hand are some wheel spacers. I just use the cards that the Hot Wheels come on. They help me space the wheels evenly from the chassis when  I glue down axles.





What else do you have in your modifying tool kit?






Thursday, July 30, 2020

Diecast 64 September 2020 Races

This month we will race all 5 classes.


  • Cars are due September 19th, 2020. Racing will start the following week. 
  • Video and results will begin to be posted the following Saturday, September 26th.
  • Local and Mail-in cars are welcome.  
  • Mail-in cars should be sent with return postage if the racer wants them back.  Return postage can be included with the cars or sent through PayPal HERE. For more information on shipping cars economically and safely check out this VIDEO.
  • Mail-in cars should also be accompanied with an ENTRY FORM.
Mail cars to:
Robby C
P.O. Box 156
Washington, Utah
84780



Open Modified 
  • Cars must be 57 grams or under. 
  • Cars may be modified for speed, looks, or both. 
  • Length: must be 3.75 inches or less 
  • Height: must be 2 inches or less 
  • Width: must fit on Hot Wheels orange track 
  • Dry lubes only 
  • 2 cars per entrant 
  • There is a $1 per car entrance fee.
  • The winning car each month in this class will be kept here at D64 to be raced in a "Car Of The Year" race at the end of the season. 

Modified Street
  • Cars must be 57 grams or under. 
  • Cars may be modified for speed, looks, or both. 
  • Must be actual production cars (Concept cars and race cars are allowed if they have a real manufacturer's name, ie. Cadillac Concept or Mitsubishi Concept, etc.)
  • 4 wheels that all touch the ground
  • Original silhouette
    • Exceptions would be cosmetic modifications such as blowers, engines, spoilers, racks on trucks, etc.
  • Original base
  • Weight must be on the inside unless it is a truck (real trucks often carry things in the back) or incorporated into an actual object you might see on a car.
  • Length: must be 3.75 inches or less 
  • Height: must be 2 inches or less 
  • Width: must fit on Hot Wheels orange track 
  • Dry lubes only 
  • 2 cars per entrant 
  • There is a $1 per car entrance fee.
  • The winning car each month in this class will be kept here at D64 to be raced in a "Car Of The Year" race at the end of the season. 

Open Stock 
  • Cars must be stock - no modifications for speed other than dry lubes 
  • Dry lubes are allowed 
  • Cars may be any brand 1/64 scale 
  • Cars must be 3.75 inches in length or less.
  • 2 cars per entrant 
  • There is a $1 per car entrance fee.
  • The winning car each month in this class will be kept here at D64 to be raced in a "Car Of The Year" race at the end of the season. 

Hot Off The Shelf 
  • Cars must be stock - no modifications for speed other than dry lubes .
  • Dry lubes are allowed.
  • Cars must be 2019 or 2020 Hot Wheels brand mainline cars.  NO premium, insert sets, character cars, color shifters, mystery, multi-packs etc., just mainline numbered cars. They need to have been bought in a regular blister with a number on them.
  • Cars must be 3.75 inches or less in length. 
  • 2 cars per entrant 
  • There is a $1 per car entrance fee.
  • The winning car each month in this class will be kept here at D64 to be raced in a "Car Of The Year" race at the end of the season. 

Feature: Six Wheel Big Rig Race



The Diecast 64 Six Wheel Big Rig Race title says it all.  We are racing Semi-Trucks with six wheels.  It can definitely be a challenge to find 2 good axles and 4 good wheels, but we're upping the anti and making it even more of a challenge, 3 good axles and 6 good wheels!
  • Trucks must be 100 grams or under.
  • Trucks must be Semi-Trucks that have 6 wheels.  
  • All 6 wheels must touch the ground.
  • Trucks need to resemble their original shape.  No major body modifications. If you want to put a big engine sticking out of the hood or spoilers or things like that, fine, but they need to look like Semi-Trucks. 
  • Trucks may be stock or modified.
  • Length: must be 4 inches or less
  • Height: must be 2 inches or less
  • Width: must fit on Hot Wheels orange track
  • Dry lubes only
  • There is a $1 per car entrance fee.
  • 2 cars per entrant 

Saturday, July 25, 2020

Diecast 64 July 2020 Race RESULTS

We saw some really great Hot Wheels racing this month with cars sent in from all over the country.  Our feature race this month was the ZAMAC Half Mile.  A 1/64 scale half mile track with shiny silver cars racing down it. This is some of the best diecast racing you'll find anywhere. We raced all five classes this month.

You can check out full printed results for the races at https://drive.google.com/embeddedfolderview?id=1xJ8rZOgHsSvfIfsYL0n5nJK8JTMzmbSS#list

Open Stock




Open Modified



Modified Street




Hot Off The Shelf




Feature Race: ZAMAC Half Mile





Saturday, July 11, 2020

Saturday, June 27, 2020

Diecast 64 June 2020 Race RESULTS

We saw some really fantastic Hot Wheels racing this month with cars sent in from all over the country.  Our feature race this month was the Gaslands Race. In addition to some great racing we saw some absolutely fantastic cars!  
This is some of the best diecast racing you'll find anywhere. We raced all five classes this month.



Open Stock



Open Modified



Modified Street



Hot Off The Shelf




Feature Race: Gaslands




Tuesday, May 26, 2020

Diecast 64 July 2020 Races

This month we will race all 5 classes.


  • Cars are due July 18th, 2020. Racing will start the following week. 
  • Video and results will begin to be posted the following Saturday, July 25th.
  • Local and Mail-in cars are welcome.  
  • Mail-in cars should be sent with return postage if the racer wants them back.  Return postage can be included with the cars or sent through PayPal HERE. For more information on shipping cars economically and safely check out this VIDEO.
  • Mail-in cars should also be accompanied with an ENTRY FORM.
Mail cars to:
Robby C
P.O. Box 156
Washington, Utah
84780



Open Modified 
  • Cars must be 57 grams or under. 
  • Cars may be modified for speed, looks, or both. 
  • Length: must be 3.75 inches or less 
  • Height: must be 2 inches or less 
  • Width: must fit on Hot Wheels orange track 
  • Dry lubes only 
  • 2 cars per entrant 
  • There is a $1 per car entrance fee.
  • The winning car each month in this class will be kept here at D64 to be raced in a "Car Of The Year" race at the end of the season. 

Modified Street
  • Cars must be 57 grams or under. 
  • Cars may be modified for speed, looks, or both. 
  • Must be actual production cars (Concept cars and race cars are allowed if they have a real manufacturer's name, ie. Cadillac Concept or Mitsubishi Concept, etc.)
  • 4 wheels that all touch the ground
  • Original silhouette
    • Exceptions would be cosmetic modifications such as blowers, engines, spoilers, racks on trucks, etc.
  • Original base
  • Weight must be on the inside unless it is a truck (real trucks often carry things in the back) or incorporated into an actual object you might see on a car.
  • Length: must be 3.75 inches or less 
  • Height: must be 2 inches or less 
  • Width: must fit on Hot Wheels orange track 
  • Dry lubes only 
  • 2 cars per entrant 
  • There is a $1 per car entrance fee.
  • The winning car each month in this class will be kept here at D64 to be raced in a "Car Of The Year" race at the end of the season. 

Open Stock 
  • Cars must be stock - no modifications for speed other than dry lubes 
  • Dry lubes are allowed 
  • Cars may be any brand 1/64 scale 
  • Cars must be 3.75 inches in length or less.
  • 2 cars per entrant 
  • There is a $1 per car entrance fee.
  • The winning car each month in this class will be kept here at D64 to be raced in a "Car Of The Year" race at the end of the season. 

Hot Off The Shelf 
  • Cars must be stock - no modifications for speed other than dry lubes .
  • Dry lubes are allowed.
  • Cars must be 2019 or 2020 Hot Wheels brand mainline cars.  NO premium, insert sets, character cars, color shifters, mystery, multi-packs etc., just mainline numbered cars. They need to have been bought in a regular blister with a number on them.
  • Cars must be 3.75 inches or less in length. 
  • 2 cars per entrant 
  • There is a $1 per car entrance fee.
  • The winning car each month in this class will be kept here at D64 to be raced in a "Car Of The Year" race at the end of the season. 

Feature: ZAMAC Half-Mile



This month's feature race is the ZAMAC Half-Mile. ZAMAC is an acronym for the Zinc, Aluminum, Magnesium, and Copper alloy that Hot Wheels and other die-cast toy cars are made from (cast).

A ZAMAC car is basically an unpainted car. ZAMAC cars have been released for the last several years by Mattel through Walmart.

For our feature race this month, ZAMAC cars will be racing on a two lane 1/64 scale half mile track.  It will be a little over 41 feet of "Dragtracks" brand track.  It is the same type of track used on the D64 Shelf Track which hosts the Hot Wheels Pick'em game (seen in the following video) as well as other tournament races.



The ZAMAC cars need to keep their original ZAMAC look.  The only part of the car you may paint or customize is the roof.  You can paint it, put flames on it, put a number on it, what ever you want to do to make it your's, but only on the roof. 

The race format for the ZAMAC half mile will be a single elimination bracket tournament.


  • Cars must be ZAMAC Cars.
  • All added weight must be inside the car and it should keep it's original silhouette.
  • Cars must keep their original ZAMAC look. The only exception to that is the roof.   
  • Cars must be 80 grams or under.
  • Cars may be stock or modified.
  • Length: must be 3.75 inches or less
  • Height: must be 2 inches or less
  • Width: must fit on Dragtracks brand track (basically HW orange track width)
  • Dry lubes only
  • There is a $1 per car entrance fee.
  • Up to 2 cars per entrant

Saturday, May 23, 2020

Diecast 64 May 2020 Race RESULTS

We saw some really fantastic Hot Wheels racing this month with cars sent in from all over the country.  Our feature race this month was the Heavyweight Downhill Dash and it did not disappoint.  The heavyweights were flying down the track clocking in some of the fastest times ever on the D64 four lane track . This is some of the best diecast racing you'll find anywhere. We raced all five classes this month..

You can check out full printed results for the races at https://drive.google.com/embeddedfolderview?id=1k8sovtcX9c9czwnmgl1QVDWFVZwmKf9l#list



Open Stock



Open Modified



Modified Street



Hot Off The Shelf




Feature Race: Heavyweight Downhill Dash





Friday, May 15, 2020

Diecast 64 June 2020 Races

This month we will race all 5 classes.


  • Cars are due June 20th, 2020. Racing will start the following week. 
  • Video and results will begin to be posted the following Saturday, June 27th.
  • Local and Mail-in cars are welcome.  
  • Mail-in cars should be sent with return postage if the racer wants them back.  Return postage can be included with the cars or sent through PayPal HERE. For more information on shipping cars economically and safely check out this VIDEO.
  • Mail-in cars should also be accompanied with an ENTRY FORM.
Mail cars to:
Robby C
P.O. Box 156
Washington, Utah
84780



Open Modified 
  • Cars must be 57 grams or under. 
  • Cars may be modified for speed, looks, or both. 
  • Length: must be 3.75 inches or less 
  • Height: must be 2 inches or less 
  • Width: must fit on Hot Wheels orange track 
  • Dry lubes only 
  • 2 cars per entrant 
  • There is a $1 per car entrance fee.
  • The winning car each month in this class will be kept here at D64 to be raced in a "Car Of The Year" race at the end of the season. 

Modified Street
  • Cars must be 57 grams or under. 
  • Cars may be modified for speed, looks, or both. 
  • Must be actual production cars (Concept cars and race cars are allowed if they have a real manufacturer's name, ie. Cadillac Concept or Mitsubishi Concept, etc.)
  • 4 wheels that all touch the ground
  • Original silhouette
    • Exceptions would be cosmetic modifications such as blowers, engines, spoilers, racks on trucks, etc.
  • Original base
  • Weight must be on the inside unless it is a truck (real trucks often carry things in the back) or incorporated into an actual object you might see on a car.
  • Length: must be 3.75 inches or less 
  • Height: must be 2 inches or less 
  • Width: must fit on Hot Wheels orange track 
  • Dry lubes only 
  • 2 cars per entrant 
  • There is a $1 per car entrance fee.
  • The winning car each month in this class will be kept here at D64 to be raced in a "Car Of The Year" race at the end of the season. 

Open Stock 
  • Cars must be stock - no modifications for speed other than dry lubes 
  • Dry lubes are allowed 
  • Cars may be any brand 1/64 scale 
  • Cars must be 3.75 inches in length or less.
  • 2 cars per entrant 
  • There is a $1 per car entrance fee.
  • The winning car each month in this class will be kept here at D64 to be raced in a "Car Of The Year" race at the end of the season. 

Hot Off The Shelf 
  • Cars must be stock - no modifications for speed other than dry lubes .
  • Dry lubes are allowed.
  • Cars must be 2019 or 2020 Hot Wheels brand mainline cars.  NO premium, insert sets, character cars, color shifters, mystery, multi-packs etc., just mainline numbered cars. They need to have been bought in a regular blister with a number on them.
  • Cars must be 3.75 inches or less in length. 
  • 2 cars per entrant 
  • There is a $1 per car entrance fee.
  • The winning car each month in this class will be kept here at D64 to be raced in a "Car Of The Year" race at the end of the season. 

Feature: Gaslands

This month's feature race is inspired by the role-playing game Gaslands. (If  you don't know anything about Gaslands you should really check it out.  Another fun way to play with your Hot Wheels - https://gaslands.com/)



In Gaslands, Earth is under Martian occupation.  The war left much of Earth destroyed and its population enslaved by the corporations of Mars.  Earth is a ghetto.  All money goes to Mars.  The internet is gone, but television continues under the global control of The Network.  The jewel in The Network's crown is Gaslands: broadcasting amateur and profesional death races from across the world as teams battle for a place in the prime-time international final.

This month racers should try to make their cars look like Post-Apocalyptic death race cars.  So what does that mean?  At the very least cars need to have some kind of weapon.  It could be spikes, guns, rocket launchers, or something of the like.  The weapon is the only real requirement, however using parts from multiple cars, making them look old/dirty/rusty, banged up, etc. is encouraged.

These cars will be racing on the D64 Banger Track which was used last year for the Demolition Derby race.



For some inspiration you can check out the Gaslands Facebook group pictures: https://www.facebook.com/groups/gaslands/photos/

or do a Google image search for "Gasland cars". https://www.google.com/search?q=gaslands+cars&sxsrf=ALeKk007byydD6yHIkntz3m1IzkiriB0wQ:1589551745778&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwi2qKLZhbbpAhUfJTQIHbccCC0Q_AUoAXoECAsQAw&biw=1298&bih=660&dpr=1.25



  • Cars Must be 60 grams or under.
  • Cars must have at least 1 "weapon".
  • Length: must be 4 inches or less
  • Height: must be 3 inches or less
  • Width: wheels must fit on Hot Wheels orange track however, spikes, weapons, etc. may stick out on the side with the total width being 2.25 inches or less.
  • Dry lubes only
  • 2 cars per entrant 
  • There is a $1 per car entrance fee.

Tuesday, May 5, 2020

Diecast 64 April Race Report

Here is the race report for the Diecast 64 April races. If you haven't already, be sure to subscribe to the new D64E YouTube channel.  Races will still be posted on the original Diecast 64 channel, but pretty much everything else will be posted on the new D64E channel. Head over to https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCleEen89zYs1vbvrwrPO7aw and subscribe.



Saturday, April 25, 2020

Diecast 64 April 2020 Race RESULTS

We saw some great Hot Wheels racing this month with cars from all over the country.  Our feature race this month was the D64 GT Classic raced on the open road track "Thunder Road". This is some of the best diecast racing you'll find anywhere. We raced all five classes this month, including out feature race the The D64 GT Classic.

You can check out full printed results for the races at https://drive.google.com/embeddedfolderview?id=1My-c5CRQYivAtmNTyyeKFvv5HWUP--sN#list


Open Stock






Open Modified






Modified Street






Hot Off The Shelf






Feature Race - The Diecast 64 GT Classic

Round 1



Round 2 Thru Finals




Monday, March 30, 2020

The Fastest Diecast Cars in the World

Matchbox vs. Hot Wheels vs. Johnny Lightning...what are the fastest diecast cars? 


If you’re into racing diecast cars and want to know which cars are the fastest then you’ve come to the right place.  I’ve been hosting races for years now and have had people send in their fastest cars from all over the country.  Obviously within each particular casting you’re going to find some that are fast and some that are duds, but here we are going to look at castings that generally are pretty quick and that have potential to be really fast.

When it comes to finding fast diecast cars, a good set of wheels and axles is really the key.  And basically that comes down to luck.  It does seem that with older cars it is easier to find good wheels and axles.  A lot of the new stuff is pretty inconsistent, but you can still find some good stuff out there.  But even though the wheels and axles come down to luck, there are some other things that all the cars of a certain casting have that makes them generally fast.

Length on a car is generally helpful. Does a car have to be long to be fast? No, but all other things being equal (which they never are) a longer car has an advantage due to its length helping it run straighter and getting it’s center of gravity higher at the start.

A car with Faster Than Ever wheels is another thing that generally helps a car be faster. It’s actually not the wheel, but the axle.  Faster Than Ever axles are nickel plated so they are smoother and have less friction than normal axles.

A well balanced casting also has an advantage over other castings that are not as well balanced.  Cars with a lower center of gravity and with the center of gravity anywhere from the center of the car to slightly in front of the back wheel seem to do well.

Weight is also something that can help out a car.  However, it doesn’t seem to be the most important thing.  Most likely because all that weight needs to be well balanced, and often it is not. Also extra weight adds more friction on the axles, so unless it has FTE axles or you get lucky with really good wheels and axles, lots of extra weight can be counter productive.  Several of the cars reviewed here are not super heavy, and some don’t compete as well with some of the heavier cars reviewed, but if they are racing in a stock class with similar weighted cars they are usually a beast, and if you have a good one, give heavier cars a run for their money.  A lot of these lighter cars are also excellent platforms for modifying.

Well, I know you are chomping at the bit to find out which Hot Wheels, Matchbox, Johnny Lightning, and other diecast cars are the fastest, so without further adieu, let’s get to it.  This list is not comprehensive and will continue to be added to.

Hot Wheels FTE Way 2 Fast
Hot Wheels FTE Cadillac V16 Concept
Hot Wheels Probe Funny Car
Hot Wheels Ferrari F40
King Kenny Pro Circuit Probe Funny Car
Johnny Lightning Coca Cola Studebaker Pickup Truck
Hot Wheels Frontrunnin' Fairmont
Hot Wheels Han Solo in Carbonite
Hot Wheels FTE Hot Tub
Hot Wheels 50th Originals Collection Custom Mustang
Hot Wheels FTE Chrysler 300C
Hot Wheels Mirada Stocker
Johnny Lightning 1971 Dodge Challenger R/T
Hot Wheels FTE ‘70 Plymouth Superbird
Hot Wheels Flat Out 442
Johnny Lightning Black With Flames '69 Camaro


Saturday, March 28, 2020

Diecast 64 March 2020 Race RESULTS

Some great Hot Wheels racing action to place this month here at Diecast 64. We had cars sent in from all over the country for some of the best diecast racing you'll find anywhere. We raced all five classes this month, including out feature race Haulers and Hot Rods.

You can check out full printed results for the races at https://drive.google.com/embeddedfolderview?id=1KIDNW7C3rFzrdWIQEg0Yw3sx5E0PtlSw#list

Open Stock







Open Modified







Modified Street







Hot Off The Shelf







Feature Race: Haulers and Hot Rods




Friday, March 27, 2020

Hot Wheels Mirada Stocker

The Mirada Stocker can be a very quick car due to its Hot Ones wheels and axles and its weight.  



In this review we are taking a closer look at the Hot Wheels Mirada Stocker.  The Mirada Stocker had a short production run in the early 80s.  The version that we tested is the yellow 1982 version with the Gold Hot Ones (GHO) wheels.  It has a black hood with the word “Dodge” and the number “10” printed on the hood and sides.  This is not the first car we’ve featured in “On The Track” with GHO wheels.  Another very fast and successful racer, the Frontrunnin’ Fairmont also sported the same wheels.  Actually, it’s not just the wheels, but like the Faster Than Ever series, it’s a combination of wheels and axles that help make this car successful on the track.  First of all let’s talk about the wheels themselves.  As seems to be the case with many pre-nineties wheels, the majority of GHO wheels that I’ve spun seem to be more true and far less likely to wobble than wheels you find on cars produced now.  That’s not to say that you won’t find bad GHO wheels, or good modern wheels, but generally the GHO wheels from the early eighties seem to be a far superior wheel when it comes to spinning straight and true.

In addition to a quality wheel, the Hot Ones axle is a bit different as well.  It is a bit thinner than the traditional Hot Wheels axle. While the smaller axle doesn’t mean less friction, the impact of that friction force is less than on a larger diameter axle.

The thinner axle also provides a bit of suspension for the car.  This can actually be a good thing or a bad thing.  If the track is fairly level, then the suspension can help smooth out the ride as the car goes over small inconsistencies in the track. However, if there are any rises in the track and the speed of the car is on the high end, I’ve seen these Hot Ones cars with the thinner axles get pretty squirrely as the thinner axles cause them to “bounce” a bit.  I even seen them launch themselves off the track on rises that were not even noticeable except upon close inspection.
Another thing that makes the Mirada Stocker a car to be reckoned with is its weight.  While not as heavy as some of Mattel’s funny cars, it comes in at 51 grams which definitely puts it on the heavier side. You’d be hard pressed to find a heavier car produced these days that doesn’t have rubber tires.  That extra weight helps it keep its speed as it cruises through the flat.

As with any casting, not every Mirada Stocker is going to have elite speed.  But your chances of finding elite speed with a Mirada Stocker is much more likely that finding it in most other Hot Wheels castings.  Good wheels, thinner axles, and good weight all help to make this casting a successful racer on the track.



Johnny Lightning Black With Flames '69 Camaro

A Johnny Lightning that is a legend among racers! 

This month we are taking a look at a car that is a legend in racing among Johnny Lightning fans, the Black With Flames ‘69 Camaro.  This car has potential to be such a fast car, that the Lincoln Johnny Lightning Race Club have began racing it in its own class because the other Johnny’s just can’t keep up.  Now just like any other casting, there is some variation.  Some are fast and some are not, but when you find a fast one, they are very fast.  So what makes this car such a good racer? 

The first thing the Black With Flames (BWF) Camaro has going for it is weight.  It is all metal, having both a metall body and a metal base.  This is not particularly uncommon among Johnny Lightning cars which gives the Johnnys a wealth of potential when it comes to racing.  The BWF Camaro weighs in at 61 grams.  Not the heaviest car you’re going to find, but definitely in that sweet spot for stock cars.  Weight is good, but too much can often slow down a car due to extra friction force or poor balance.  In a modified race you can get away with much more weight as modifications are made to minimize the negative effects of the extra weight.  But often I have found that stock cars tend to perform better if they are in that 55 - 75 gram sweet spot.  Enough weight to keep the kinetic energy high and keep the cars speed in the flat, but not so much that the extra friction force outweighs the extra energy advantage.  However there are other 61 gram cars that don’t perform as well as the BWF Camaro and even have the same wheel setup, so there is something special about the BWF Camaro.

Part of a car’s good performance depends on how that weight is distributed.  Ideally you would like the center of gravity, low and towards the back.  Keeping the center of gravity low keeps the car more stable and running straighter with less wobble.  Keeping it toward the back gives the car more kinetic energy to keep its speed in the flat. However, if it is too far back (over or behind the back axle) then the car becomes more unstable and doesn’t perform as well.  The BWF Camaro has great weight balance and that helps it perform better than other cars of similar weight. 

The wheel setup on the BWF Camaro is similar to other Johnny Lightnings in that it has the cap on the wheel that covers the end of the axle.  This keeps the wheel from rubbing on the chassis of the car, but the trade off is that the axle head rubs on the inside of the hub.  That could be an advantage or not just depending on the smoothness of the hub vs. the smoothness of the chassis which could differ from car to car.  If you are running in a no graphite race, it shouldn’t be a disadvantage, but it can be a bit of a disadvantage in a race that allows graphite.  In a car without the hub, you can get the graphite to the three places where you have friction.  You have easy access to where the wheel rubs on the chassis.  You have easy access to where the axle head rubs on the wheel.  And it is pretty easy to work the graphite into the axle hole in the wheel where the wheel rubs on the axle.  In the hub cap Johnny lightning setup, you can get the graphite into the axle hole but the wheel doesn’t rub on the chassis so putting graphite there doesn’t help, and you don’t have easy access to where the axle head rubs on the hub or the wheel, so you just have to hope that some graphite works its way inside.  For this reason I feel like the Johnny Lightnings are at a disadvantage when racing in a race that allows graphite.  This is the reason that I think that the BWF Camaros are such a force that they need their own class at the Lincoln Johnny Lightning Race Club races but only sometimes crack the top 10 in the Diecast 64 stock races.  The LJLRC race without graphite and the D64 races allow graphite. 

But with or without graphite, the Black With Flames Camaro is a fantastic racer.  It’s reputation seems to have grown as of late and it is becoming a much more difficult car to get.  The few that I see on eBay these days are ridiculously priced.  So unless you seriously race in non-graphite leagues, you may have to be patient and wait for the right opportunity to come along before it gets added to your racing collection.



Hot Wheels Flat Out 442

Another GHO car that is a must have for your racing collection 

This review we are taking a closer look at the Hot Ones Flat Out 442.  This racing version of an Oldsmobile Cutlass 442 was introduced as the Flat Out 442 in 1979.  This first version came out in orange.  The yellow Hot Ones version with the Gold Hot Ones wheels that we are looking at came out in 1982.  This isn’t the first car we’ve reviewed with the GHO (Gold Hot Ones) wheels.  We’ve also looked at the Frontrunnin’ Fairmont and the Mirada Stocker.  Of the three, the 442 comes in the lightest at 47 grams but can still be a very quick car.  While it’s not a heavyweight compared to a lot of Hot Wheels cars, when put up against newer Hot Wheels that you find on the pegs these days, 47 grams puts it at the top end and it shouldn’t have any trouble beating these newer Hot Wheels.  Even against older heavier Hot Wheels it will still see quite a bit of success and that is due to its GHO wheels.  First of all, these are just great wheels.  While you’re always going to find some that are better and some that are worse, generally the GHO wheels show pretty good balance and spin pretty straight and true.  Then there are the axles.  They are a bit thinner than normal Hot Wheels axles.  There is a common misconception when it comes to friction that thinner or smaller or less surface touching means less friction.  That’s just not the case.  Friction is not impacted by the amount of surface that is in contact.  Surface area is not part of the equation.  It simply depends on the kind of surface and how hard those surfaces are being pushed together (which is usually the weight when it comes to racing). So contrary to popular belief, the thinner axles don’t mean less friction.  However, because of some rotational physics, the thinner axles do mean that the impact of that friction force is going to be less, which is an advantage.

 Another advantage that the 442 has is that it is fairly wide.  Its width helps it run straighter down the track with less pronounced bouncing back and forth between the sidewalls.  This can be a great advantage, especially with the thinner axles when compared to other GHO cars.  The thinner axles provide a slight suspension to the GHO cars, which can be good, but can also be detrimental.  The problem arises when a GHO car starts to wobble at high speeds.  The thinner axle suspension just magnifies the wobble and turns it into a literal death wobble as the cars can quite frequently come off the track and not finish the race.  Usually these GHO cars will get into the death wobble if the track is fast (high drop) but not particularly straight or smooth.  Sometimes it’s just the slightest variation that will cause the problem.  But the 442’s width helps in that regard, especially when compared to cars like the Fairmont and Mirada Stocker.

While the 442 will often get beat out by its GHO brother the Frontrunnin’ Fairmont, it will usually hold its own against most other cars and is a great car to have in your racing collection!


Hot Wheels FTE ‘70 Plymouth Superbird

A Superbird that's super fast!  

This review we are going to take a closer look at the Faster Than Ever ‘70 Plymouth Superbird.  The superbird was first introduced to the Hot Wheels line-up back in 2006.  There were quite a few different versions released that year, but the Faster Than Ever version turned out to be quite a quick little car.  Of course it’s first and obvious advantage is the Faster Than Ever wheels and axles.  The nickel-plated axles help reduce friction as the wheels rotate around the axles.  Less friction translates into more speed on the track.  The open spoke Faster Than Ever wheels also help.  These wheels are lighter than solid wheels so they take less energy to rotate.  That means more of the car’s energy can be used to get it down the track and glossing over some “mathy” physics, that means a faster car.

One of the defining features of the Superbird is that long pointed nose.  While it does make the Superbird a bit more aerodynamic, it also gives it another advantage.  That extra length on the front of the car pushes its center of gravity farther back.  On a sloped track, farther back means higher, and higher means more potential energy.  Potential energy depends on 3 things.  Gravity, the mass of the object, and its height off the ground.  Gravity is pretty much a constant (unless you decide to go race on the moon) but we can change the mass of the car or it’s height off the ground and give it more potential energy.  However, only one of those things translates into a greater possible velocity, height.  Yes, a more massive car will usually be a faster car, but not because of the potential energy/velocity relationship.  Theoretically, for any given height, there is a maximum velocity that the car can reach and it is independent of the car’s mass.  A more massive car just doesn’t slow down as much as a lighter car, but for the same height they both have the same potential maximum velocity.  However the potential maximum velocity is dependent on height, so a car that starts out higher has a greater potential maximum velocity. In theory anyway.  There are lots of variables to consider, but all other things being equal, the fact that the Superbirds nose pushes it’s center of gravity a little higher on the track should be an advantage.

The Superbird also has the advantage of a pretty long wheel base.  That long wheel base helps the Superbird run straighter down the track.  And we all know that the shortest distance between two points is a straight line.  Not only is a straight line run down the track a shorter distance, but less impacts on the sidewalls of the track is an obvious advantage.

One disadvantage that the Superbird has is that it isn’t very heavy.  Weighing in at 39 grams, it is actually relatively light compared to many of the cars we’ve looked at so far.  That fact keeps it from being an elite performer in open weight stock races, but in stock races that are classed close to its weight it’s going to be a tough car to beat.  Because of all the other things it has going for it, it is also a great casting to modify.  Add a little weight to it and you can have a very fast, top performing car.
Even though the Superbird is a bit light, it is still a car that should be part of your racing collection.  It’s Faster Than Ever wheels, long nose, and long wheel base make it a force to be reckoned with.



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